Barriers to increasing fundraising governance skills on charity boards revealed

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis26 Melanie May | 14 July 2016 | News Tagged with: governance Research / statistics trustees A joint report into fundraisers and trusteeship by the Social Change Agency with the Institute of Fundraising, Peridot Partners and Hubbub has revealed the key barriers to increasing fundraising governance skills on charity boards.An initial survey by the IoF among fundraisers showed that over 90% believe having a fundraiser on their board of trustees would be helpful in their day job, with 78% saying that the idea of being a trustee appealed to them. However, it also revealed that 81% felt that fundraising skills and experience were under-represented on the boards and charities they had worked on.A subsequent GetRaising! event to find out why more fundraisers do not become trustees, brought together fundraisers, board members, Chairs, and CEOs and used open space methodology to explore the question “How can we increase fundraising governance skills and leadership in trustee boards?”.The results, shared in the resulting report GetRaising! Increasing Fundraising Skills on Trustee Boards, reveal the top 7 barriers to increasing fundraising governance skills on charity boards.Fundraisers feel that they are not the ‘right fit’ for charity boards, so are put off from applying.The perception of the time needed to be an effective trustee. Many thought the nature of the role unsuitable for a working person. Fundraisers felt they would be unable to secure the time off work, or fit the role in with their other commitments if they were not supported to take on trustee roles by their employers.Many fundraisers do not know where or how to look for trustee roles.When recruiting, it was felt that boards look for more traditional skills such as accountancy or legal experience, and do not consider fundraising skills to be as relevant.Where there are fundraisers on boards, like other specialist people, fundraiser-trustees feel pigeonholed and limited to operational considerations that may restrict their contribution, or leave them feeling exploited.The opposite problem can also occur, where boards misunderstand how professional fundraising should fit into wider organisational strategy. This can result in fundraising governance being taken off the board agenda altogether, reducing the effectiveness of any fundraiser-trustees or board-wide responsibility of fundraising.There are both real and perceived conflicts of interest when it comes to opening up contacts and networks for fundraising. Having fundraisers on boards may only serve to enable cannibalisation of contacts and resources.The report makes 18 recommendations for increasing fundraising governance on charity boards, including: ensuring that boards are clear on what they want from a fundraising focused trustee and make this part of any trustee recruitment strategy, ensuring that boards and chairs develop a greater awareness of the full range of benefits of having fundraisers as trustees, ensuring that charities consider how they can support their staff to become trustees, and the sector doing more to promote the benefits of fundraiser-trustees.The full report can be downloaded here: www.thesocialchangeagency.org/get-raising.pdf.  101 total views,  1 views today Advertisement Barriers to increasing fundraising governance skills on charity boards revealed  102 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis26 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

HMS Prince of Wales receives fuel for first time

first_img View post tag: Royal Navy Photo: Photo: Royal Navy View post tag: QE class View post tag: HMS Prince of Walescenter_img Share this article The future Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Prince of Wales has taken fuel on board for the first time to test its systems.500 tons of marine diesel – which represents 15 per cent of HMS Prince of Wales’ capacity according to the Royal Navy – have been pumped onto the carrier to test the tanks, pipes, and sampling system.Looking after that amount of fuel is considerably harder than most people might think. If left alone marine diesel can provide an attractive environment for micro-biological growth (or MBG).Infected fuel can damage the 36MW Rolls-Royce Gas Turbines or Wartsila Diesel Generators, while removing the growth is no easy task, with tanks requiring emptying and chemically cleaning.This is why the crew practiced “fuel management” as part of the process. The fuel was first inspected by a services engineer who approved it for use in the ship’s engines while a second main test timed the fuel as it passed through a filter; the faster it passes through, the cleaner it is. Finally, a fuel sample is also sent away for analysis by a laboratory, whose experts advise the RN on the chemical make-up of the fuel.HMS Prince of Wales is the second of two new Royal Navy aircraft carriers delivered by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance (ACA), a partnering relationship between the British industry and the defense ministry.The 65,000-ton ship was launched in December 2017 at Rosyth and is expected to start to sea trials in 2019.last_img read more